hspencer77:

Eucalyptus 3.1 on Github…NICE!

Originally posted on Greg DeKoenigsberg Speaks:

We now have beta packages, along with installation instructions, available for CentOS/RHEL and Ubuntu.

Note: beta still means beta. We’re aiming for release candidates for Eucalyptus 3.1 within the next month or so.  Still, these packages are pretty stable for us so far, pass the majority of our ridiculous battery of QA tests, and are altogether suitable for a quick install to see what the fuss is all about.  And it’s a whole lot simpler than building from source.

As always, questions can be directed to mailing list or forums or IRC.

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hspencer77:

Good layout of configuration management recipes that can be used with Eucalyptus/AWS. Looking forward to contributing to this project. Good work Andrew!

Originally posted on Semi-Empirical Shenanigans:

Automation and configuration management is a big part of any successful cloud deployment. Whether on AWS, Eucalyptus or another cloud provider, having services that can be easily spun up and down with a consistent configuration is a must at cloud scale. The recipes project is looking to assist new cloud users with a first step.

The recipes project is attempting to be as vendor agnostic as possible by using both Puppet and Chef with the possible expansion to more options (Fabric, Ansible, etc) in the future. The project will be showing users basic techniques to get started with configuration management once their cloud is up and running. The project will also attempt to tie in the plentiful resources already available from these vibrant communities to extend the flexibility of deployments.

To help users with this a repository on GitHub has been created. The simple structure will…

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hspencer77:

Eucalyptus 3.1 is out on Github! Check it out!

Originally posted on Greg DeKoenigsberg Speaks:

It’s taken a while, but the move is complete.  The source code for Eucalyptus 3.1 Beta is open and publicly available in Github.  It’s actually been there for a while now, but we’ve done enough housekeeping and we’re ready to open the doors.

Build instructions can be found in the INSTALL file, but they are still in flux; comments and patches are welcome.  Don’t hesitate to join us on #eucalyptus on freenode or on our community mailing list if you have questions.

Packages for the beta will be available for various distros in the coming days.  Special props go to Debian Partner company Credativ for their impressive work on the Google Web Toolkit libraries.

We’re also working on our new bug tracker; we’re in private beta to work through various auth and workflow kinks.  If you’re interested, ask for access on IRC or the mailing list, and we will…

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hspencer77:

Good cloud-init work done by Mr. Holms.

Originally posted on /dev/zero:

It is sort of becoming a tradition for each member of the Fedora Board to declare a personal goal of some sort and then lead by doing. So now that I am the newest Board member, some people are curious about my plans.

In 2010 I helped get Fedora’s Cloud SIG off the ground. At that point in time our main goal was to get a modern version of Fedora running inside Amazon’s popular cloud, EC2. Nowadays the EC2 image is part of Fedora’s regular release process and the Cloud SIG has grown into one of Fedora’s most vibrant groups, added support for one self-hosted cloud platform, and is on the way to adding several more.

In light of that, the answer is obvious: I plan to help the Cloud SIG continue to be successful.

Of course, that’s a rather vague goal, so here are some examples of what success…

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hspencer77:

Some good Git work. Good explanation on how to get out of a tricky situation. Thanks!

Originally posted on /dev/zero:

Today I did some work on a branch in git only to discover that I based it on some unstable code rather than the stable code that I usually want to use as a baseline.

You can fix this by using a bit of git’s rebase magic:

1

This moves the entire current branch onto another.

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