CoreOS CloudInit Config for Docker Storage Management

CoreOS is a Linux distribution that allows easy deployment of Docker environments.  With CoreOS, users have the ability to deploy clustered Docker environments,  or deploy zero downtime applications.  Recently, I have blogged about how to deploy and use Docker on Eucalyptus cloud environments. This blog will focus on how to leverage cloud-init configuration with a CoreOS EMI to manage instance storage that will be used by Docker containers on Eucalyptus 4.0.  The same cloud-init configuration file can be used  on AWS with CoreOS AMIs, which is yet another example of how Eucalyptus has continued to maintain its focus on being the best on-premise AWS compatible cloud environment.

Prerequisites

Since Eucalyptus Identity and Access Management (IAM) is very similar to AWS’s IAM, at a minimum – the following Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) actions need to be allowed:

In order to bundle, upload and register the CoreOS image, use the following AWS S3 policy (which can be generated using AWS Policy Generator):

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1402675433766",
      "Action": "s3:*",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "*"
    }
  ]
}

For more information about how to use Eucalyptus IAM, please refer to the Eucalyptus 4.0 Administrator documentation regarding access concepts and policy overview.

In addition to the correct IAM policy being applied to the user, here are the other prerequisites that need to be met:

Once these prerequisites are met, the Eucalyptus user will be able to implement the topic for this blog.

CoreOS CloudInit Config for Docker Storage Management

As mentioned in the CoreOS documentation regarding how to use CoreOS with Eucalyptus, the user needs to do the following:

  • Download the CoreOS image
  • Decompress the CoreOS image
  • Bundle, upload and register the image

For example:

# wget -q http://beta.release.core-os.net/amd64-usr/current/coreos_production_openstack_image.img.bz2

# bunzip2 coreos_production_openstack_image.img.bz2

# qemu-img convert -O raw coreos_production_openstack_image.img coreos_production_openstack_image.raw
# euca-bundle-and-upload-image -i coreos_production_openstack_image.raw -b coreos-production-beta -r x86_64
# euca-register -n coreos-production coreos-production-beta/coreos_production_openstack_image.raw.manifest.xml --virtualization-type hvm
IMAGE emi-98868F66

After the image is registered, create a security group and authorize port 22 for SSH access to the CoreOS instance:

# euca-create-group coreos-testing -d "Security Group for CoreOS Cluster"
GROUP sg-C8E3B168 coreos-testing Security Group for CoreOS Cluster
# euca-authorize -P tcp -p ssh coreos-testing
GROUP coreos-testing
PERMISSION coreos-testing ALLOWS tcp 22 22 FROM CIDR 0.0.0.0/0

Next, create a keypair that will be used to access the CoreOS instance:

# euca-create-keypair coreos > coreos.priv
# chmod 0600 coreos.priv

Now, we are need to create the cloud-init configuration file.  CoreOS implements a subset of cloud-init config spec with coreos-cloudinit.  The cloud-init config below will do the following:

  1. wipe the the ephemeral device – /dev/vdb (since the CoreOS EMI is an instance store-backed HVM image, ephemeral device will be /dev/vdb)
  2. format the ephemeral device with BTRFS filesystem
  3. mount /dev/vdb to /var/lib/docker (which is the location for images used by the Docker containers)

Create a cloud-init.config file with the following information:

#cloud-config
coreos:
 units:
 - name: format-ephemeral.service
 command: start
 content: |
 [Unit]
 Description=Formats the ephemeral drive
 [Service]
 Type=oneshot
 RemainAfterExit=yes
 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/wipefs -f /dev/vdb
 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/mkfs.btrfs -f /dev/vdb
 - name: var-lib-docker.mount
 command: start
 content: |
 [Unit]
 Description=Mount ephemeral to /var/lib/docker
 Requires=format-ephemeral.service
 Before=docker.service
 [Mount]
 What=/dev/vdb
 Where=/var/lib/docker
 Type=btrfs

Use euca-describe-instance-types to select the desired instance type for the CoreOS instance (in this example, c1.medium will be used).

# euca-describe-instance-types 
INSTANCETYPE Name CPUs Memory (MiB) Disk (GiB)
INSTANCETYPE t1.micro 1 256 5
INSTANCETYPE m1.small 1 512 10
INSTANCETYPE m1.medium 1 1024 10
INSTANCETYPE c1.xlarge 2 2048 10
INSTANCETYPE m1.large 2 1024 15
INSTANCETYPE c1.medium 1 1024 20
INSTANCETYPE m1.xlarge 2 1024 30
INSTANCETYPE m2.2xlarge 2 4096 30
INSTANCETYPE m3.2xlarge 4 4096 30
INSTANCETYPE m2.xlarge 2 2048 40
INSTANCETYPE m3.xlarge 2 2048 50
INSTANCETYPE cc1.4xlarge 8 3072 60
INSTANCETYPE m2.4xlarge 8 4096 60
INSTANCETYPE hi1.4xlarge 8 6144 120
INSTANCETYPE cc2.8xlarge 16 6144 120
INSTANCETYPE cg1.4xlarge 16 12288 200
INSTANCETYPE cr1.8xlarge 16 16384 240
INSTANCETYPE hs1.8xlarge 48 119808 24000

Use euca-run-instances to launch the CoreOS image as an instance, passing the cloud-init.config file using the –user-data-file option:

# euca-run-instances -k coreos -t c1.medium emi-98868F66 --user-data-file cloud-init-docker-storage.config
RESERVATION r-FC799274 408396244283 default
INSTANCE i-AF303D5D emi-98868F66 pending coreos 0 c1.medium 2014-06-12T13:38:31.008Z ViciousLiesAndDangerousRumors monitoring-disabled 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 instance-store hvm sg-A5133B59

Once the instance reaches the ‘running’ state, SSH into the instance to see the ephemeral storage mounted and formatted correctly:

# euca-describe-instances i-AF303D5D --region account1-user01@
RESERVATION r-FC799274 408396244283 default
INSTANCE i-AF303D5D emi-98868F66 euca-10-104-6-236.bigboi.acme.eucalyptus-systems.com euca-172-18-238-171.bigboi.internal running coreos 0 c1.medium 2014-06-12T13:38:31.008Z ViciousLiesAndDangerousRumors monitoring-disabled 10.104.6.236 172.18.238.17 instance-store hvm sg-A5133B59
# ssh -i coreos.priv core@euca-10-104-6-236.bigboi.acme.eucalyptus-systems.com
CoreOS (beta)
core@localhost ~ $ lsblk
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
vda 254:0 0 8.3G 0 disk
|-vda1 254:1 0 128M 0 part
|-vda2 254:2 0 64M 0 part
|-vda3 254:3 0 1G 0 part
|-vda4 254:4 0 1G 0 part /usr
|-vda6 254:6 0 128M 0 part /usr/share/oem
`-vda9 254:9 0 6G 0 part /
vdb 254:16 0 11.7G 0 disk /var/lib/docker
core@localhost ~ $ mount
.......
/dev/vda6 on /usr/share/oem type ext4 (rw,nodev,relatime,commit=600,data=ordered
/dev/vdb on /var/lib/docker type btrfs (rw,relatime,space_cache)

The instance is now ready for docker containers to be created.  For some docker container examples, check out the CoreOS documentation and the Docker documentation.

Enjoy!

CoreOS CloudInit Config for Docker Storage Management

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