Yet Another AWS Compatibility Example Using Vagrant-AWS Plugin and Eucalyptus 3.4 to Deploy Docker

Something that Eucalyptus has been constant about from the beginning is its stance on being the best open source, on-premise AWS-compatible cloud on the market.   This blog entry is just another example of demonstrating this compatibility.

My most recent blog entries have been centered around Docker and how to deploy it on Eucalyptus.  This entry will show how a user can take Docker’s own documentation on deploying Docker using Vagrant with AWS - but with Eucalyptus.   Before getting started, there are some prerequisites that need to be in place.

Prerequisites for Eucalyptus Cloud

In order to get started, the Eucalyptus cloud needs to have an Ubuntu Raring Cloud Image bundled, uploaded and registered before the steps below can be followed.  The previous blog entries below will help here:

In addition to the Ubuntu Raring Cloud EMI being available, the user also needs to have the following:

After these prerequisites have been met, the user is ready to set up Vagrant to interact with Eucalyptus.

Setting up Vagrant Environment

To start out, we need to set up the Vagrant environment.  The steps below will get you going:

  1. Install Vagrant from http://www.vagrantup.com/. (optional – package manager can be used here instead)
  2. Install the vagrant aws plugin:  

    vagrant plugin install vagrant-aws

After Vagrant and the vagrant aws plugin have been successfully installed, all that is left is to create a Vagrantfile to provide information to Vagrant as to how to interact with Eucalyptus.  Since the vagrant aws plugin is being used, and Eucalyptus is compatible with AWS, the configuration will be very similar to AWS.

I provided a Vagrantfile on Github to help get users up to speed quicker.  To check out the Vagrantfile, just clone the repository from Github:

$ git clone https://github.com/hspencer77/eucalyptus-docker-raring.git

After checking out the file, change directory to eucalyptus-docker-raring, and edit the following variables to match your user information for the Eucalyptus cloud that will run the Docker instance:

AWS_ENDPOINT = "<EC2_URL for Eucalyptus Cloud>"
AWS_AMI = "<ID for Ubuntu Raring EMI>"
AWS_ACCESS_KEY = "<Access Key ID>"
AWS_SECRET_KEY = "<Secret Key>"
AWS_KEYPAIR_NAME = "<Key Pair name>"
AWS_INSTANCE_TYPE = '<VM type>'
SSH_PRIVKEY_PATH = "<The path to the private key for the named keypair, for example ~/.ssh/docker.pem>"

Once the Vagrantfile is populated with the correct information, we are now ready to launch the Docker instance.

Launch the Docker Instance Using Vagrant

From here, Vagrant makes this very straight-forward.  There are only two steps to launch the Docker instance.

  1. Run the following command to launch the instance:

     vagrant up --provider=aws
  2. After Vagrant finishes deploying the instance, SSH into the instance:

    vagrant ssh

Thats it!  Once you are SSHed into the instance, to run Docker, execute the following command:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-120-212:~$ sudo docker

You have successfully launched a Docker instance on Eucalyptus using Vagrant.  Since Eucalyptus works with the vagrant aws plugin, the same Vagrantfile can be used against AWS (of course, the values for the variables above will change).  This is a perfect dev/test to production setup whether Eucalyptus is being used for dev/test and AWS being used for production (and vise versa).

Deploying CentOS 6.5 Image in Docker on Eucalyptus 3.4

This blog entry is a follow-up of my blog entry entitled “Step-by-Step Deployment of Docker on Eucalyptus 3.4 for the Cloud Administrator“.  In that blog entry, I covered how to deploy an Ubuntu Raring Cloud Image on Eucalyptus, and use that image to deploy Docker.   The really cool thing about Docker is that it provides the ability to deploy different operating systems within one machine – in this case, an instance.   The focus of this entry is to show how to deploy a CentOS 6.5 image in a instance running Docker on Eucalyptus 3.4.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this blog is to complete the steps outlined in my previous blog about Docker on Eucalyptus 3.4.  Once those steps are completed by the cloud administrator (i.e. a user associated with the ‘eucalyptus’ account), you can get started  on the steps below.  One thing to note here, to follow these steps, there is no need to be the cloud administrator.  This entry is entirely directed to cloud users.  Since Eucalyptus IAM is similar to AWS IAM, the following EC2 Actions need to be allowed for the cloud user:

Instance Deployment

To get started, we need to launch the Ubuntu Raring EMI that has been provided by the cloud administrator.  In this example, the EMI will be emi-26403979:

$ euca-describe-images emi-26403979 --region account1-user01@
IMAGE emi-26403979 ubuntu-raring-docker-rootfs-v3/ubuntu-raring-docker-v3.manifest.xml
 441445882805 available private x86_64 machine eki-17093995 
eri-6BF033EE instance-store paravirtualized

If the –region option seems confusing, this is due to the fact that I am using the nice configuration file feature in Euca2ools.  Its really helpful when you are using different credentials for different users.

Now that we know the EMI we can use, lets launch the instance.  We will be using the cloud-init config file from my previous Docker blog to configure the instance.  The VM type used here is c1.xlarge.  This is because I wanted to make sure I had 2 CPU, and 2 Gigs of RAM for my instance:

$ euca-run-instances -k account1-user01 -t c1.xlarge 
--user-data-file cloud-init-docker.config emi-26403979 
--region account1-user01@
RESERVATION r-2EE941D4 961915002812 default
INSTANCE i-503642D4 emi-26403979 euca-0-0-0-0.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
 euca-0-0-0-0.eucalyptus.internal pending account1-user01 0 
c1.xlarge 2014-02-14T00:47:15.632Z LayinDaSmackDown eki-17093995 
eri-6BF033EE monitoring-disabled 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 instance-store paravirtualized

Make sure the instance gets into the running state:

$ euca-describe-instances --region account1-user01@
RESERVATION r-2EE941D4 961915002812 default
INSTANCE i-503642D4 emi-26403979 euca-10-104-7-10.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
 euca-172-17-112-207.eucalyptus.internal running 
account1-user01 0 c1.xlarge 2014-02-14T00:47:15.632Z 
LayinDaSmackDown eki-17093995 eri-6BF033EE monitoring-disabled 
10.104.7.10 172.17.112.207 instance-store paravirtualized

Now thats in the running state, lets SSH into the instance to make sure its up and running:

$ ssh -i account1-user01.priv ubuntu@euca-10-104-7-10.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
Welcome to Ubuntu 13.04 (GNU/Linux 3.8.0-33-generic x86_64)
* Documentation: https://help.ubuntu.com/
System information as of Fri Feb 14 00:49:52 UTC 2014
System load: 0.21 Users logged in: 0
 Usage of /: 21.8% of 4.80GB IP address for eth0: 172.17.112.207
 Memory usage: 5% IP address for lxcbr0: 10.0.3.1
 Swap usage: 0% IP address for docker0: 10.42.42.1
 Processes: 85
Graph this data and manage this system at https://landscape.canonical.com/
Get cloud support with Ubuntu Advantage Cloud Guest:

http://www.ubuntu.com/business/services/cloud

Use Juju to deploy your cloud instances and workloads:

https://juju.ubuntu.com/#cloud-raring

Your Ubuntu release is not supported anymore.
For upgrade information, please visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/releaseendoflife

New release '13.10' available.
Run 'do-release-upgrade' to upgrade to it.
Last login: Tue Nov 19 00:48:23 2013 from odc-d-06-07.prc.eucalyptus-systems.com
ubuntu@euca-172-17-112-207:~$

Now its time to prepare the instance to create your own base Docker CentOS 6.5 image.

Preparing the Instance

To prepare the instance to create the base image, install the following packages using apt-get:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-112-207:~$ sudo -s
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# apt-get install rinse perl rpm \
rpm2cpio libwww-perl liblwp-protocol-https-perl

After the packages finish installing, lets go ahead and mount the ephemeral storage on the instance as /tmp to give Docker extra space for building the base image:

root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# curl http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/block-device-mapping/ephemeral0
sda2
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# mount /dev/vda2 /tmp
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# df -ah
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/vda1 4.8G 1.1G 3.5G 24% /
proc 0 0 0 - /proc
sysfs 0 0 0 - /sys
none 4.0K 0 4.0K 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
none 0 0 0 - /sys/fs/fuse/connections
none 0 0 0 - /sys/kernel/debug
none 0 0 0 - /sys/kernel/security
udev 993M 8.0K 993M 1% /dev
devpts 0 0 0 - /dev/pts
tmpfs 201M 240K 201M 1% /run
none 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock
none 1002M 0 1002M 0% /run/shm
none 100M 0 100M 0% /run/user
/dev/vda2 9.4G 150M 8.8G 2% /tmp
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# lsblk
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
vda 253:0 0 15G 0 disk
├─vda1 253:1 0 5G 0 part /
├─vda2 253:2 0 9.5G 0 part /tmp
└─vda3 253:3 0 512M 0 part

Next, download the mkimage-rinse.sh script from the Docker repository on Github:

root@euca-172-17-112-207:~#  wget --no-check-certificate https://raw.github.com/dotcloud/docker/master/contrib/mkimage-rinse.sh
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# chmod 755 mkimage-rinse.sh

Now we are ready to build the CentOS 6.5 Base Image.

Building the CentOS Image

The only thing left to do is build the base image.  Use mkimage-rinse.sh to build the CentOS 6.5 base image:

root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# ./mkimage-rinse.sh ubuntu/centos centos-6

After the installation is complete, test out the base image:

root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# docker run ubuntu/centos:6.5 cat /etc/centos-release
CentOS release 6.5 (Final)

Now we have a CentOS 6.5 base image.  The mkimage-rinse.sh script can also be used to install CentOS 5 base images as well.  Instead of passing centos-6, just pass centos-5.  For example, I have created a CentOS 5 base image in this instance as well.  Below shows the output of the images added to Docker:

root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# docker images
REPOSITORY TAG IMAGE ID CREATED VIRTUAL SIZE
ubuntu/centos 5.10 06019bdea24b 2 minutes ago 123.8 MB
ubuntu/centos 6.5 cd23a8442c8a 2 hours ago 127.3 MB
root@euca-172-17-112-207:~# docker run ubuntu/centos:5.10 cat /etc/redhat-release
CentOS release 5.10 (Final)

As you can see, Docker helps developers test their software across multiple Linux distributions.  With Eucalyptus (just as in AWS), users can use the ephemeral nature of instances to quickly stand up this test environment in one instance.

12 Steps To EBS-Backed EMI Bliss on Eucalyptus

In previous posts, I shared how to use Ubuntu Cloud Images and eustore with Eucalyptus and AWS.  This blog entry will focus on how to use these assets to create EBS-backed EMIs in 12 steps.   These steps can be used on AWS as well, but instead of creating an instance store-backed AMI first, Ubuntu has already provided AMIs that can be used as the building block instance on AWS.  Let’s get started.

Prerequisites

On Eucalyptus and AWS, it is required the user has the appropriate IAM policy in order to perform these steps.  The policy should contain the following EC2 Actions at a minimum:

  • RunInstances
  • AttachVolume
  • AuthorizeSecurityGroupEgress
  • AuthorizeSecurityGroupIngress
  • CreateKeyPair
  • CreateSnapshot
  • CreateVolume
  • DescribeImages
  • DescribeInstances
  • DescribeInstanceStatus
  • DescribeSnapshots
  • DetachVolume
  • RegisterImage

In addition, the user needs an access key ID and secret key.  For more information, check out the following resources:

This entry also assumes Eucalyptus euca2ools are installed on the client machine.

The 12 Steps

Although the Ubuntu Cloud Image used in this entry is Ubuntu Precise (12.04) LTS, any of of the maintained Ubuntu Cloud images can be used.

  1. Use wget to download tar-gzipped precise-server-cloudimg:
    $ wget http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/precise/current/precise-server-cloudimg-amd64.tar.gz
  2. After setting the EC2_ACCESS_KEY, EC2_SECRET_KEY, and EC2_URL, use eustore-install-image to an instance stored-backed EMI:
    $ eustore-install-image -t precise-server-cloudimg-amd64.tar.gz \
    -b ubuntu-latest-precise-x86_64 --hypervisor universal \
    -s "Ubuntu Cloud Image - Precise Pangolin - 12.04 LTS"
  3. Create a keypair using euca-create-keypair, then use euca-run-instances to launch an instance from the EMI returned from eustore-install-image. For example:
    $ euca-run-instances -t m1.medium \
    -k account1-user01 emi-5C8C3909
  4. Use euca-create-volume to create a volume based upon the size of how big you want the root filesystem to be.  The availability zone (-z option) will be based on if you are using Eucalyptus or AWS:
    $ euca-create-volume -s 6 \
    -z LayinDaSmackDown
  5. Using euca-attach-volume, attach the resulting volume to the running instance. For example:
    $ euca-attach-volume -d /dev/vdd \
    -i i-839E3FB0 vol-B5863B3B
  6. Use euca-authorize to open SSH access to the instance, SSH into the instance, then use wget to download the Ubuntu Precise Cloud Image (qcow2 format):
    $ ssh -i account1-user01.priv ubuntu@euca-10-104-7-10.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
    # sudo -s
    # wget http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/precise/current/precise-server-cloudimg-amd64-disk1.img
  7. Install qemu-utils:
    # apt-get install -y qemu-utils
  8. Use qemu-img to convert image from qcow2 to raw:
    # qemu-img convert \
    -O raw precise-server-cloudimg-amd64-disk1.img precise-server-cloudimg-amd64-disk1-raw.img
  9. dd raw image to block device where volume is attached (use dmesg to figure that out easily):
    # dmesg | tail
    [ 7026.943212] virtio-pci 0000:00:05.0: using default PCI settings
    [ 7026.943249] pci 0000:00:07.0: no hotplug settings from platform
    [ 7026.943251] pci 0000:00:07.0: using default PCI settings
    [ 7026.945964] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: enabling device (0000 -> 0003)
    [ 7026.955143] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: PCI INT A -> Link[LNKC] -> GSI 10 (level, high) -> IRQ 10
    [ 7026.955180] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: setting latency timer to 64
    [ 7026.955429] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: irq 45 for MSI/MSI-X
    [ 7026.955456] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: irq 46 for MSI/MSI-X
    [ 7026.986990] vdb: unknown partition table
    [10447.093426] virtio-pci 0000:00:07.0: PCI INT A disabled
    # dd if=/mnt/precise-server-cloudimg-amd64-disk1-raw.img of=/dev/vdb bs=1M
  10. Log out the instance, and use euca-detach-volume to detach the volume:
    $ euca-detach-volume vol-B5863B3B
  11. Use euca-create-snapshot to create a snapshot of the volume:
    $ euca-create-snapshot vol-B5863B3B
  12. Use euca-register to register the resulting snapshot to create the EBS-backed EMI:
    $ euca-register --name ebs-precise-x86_64-sda \
    --snapshot snap-EFDB40A1 --root-device-name /dev/sda

Thats it!  You have successfully created an EBS-backed EMI/AMI.  As mentioned earlier, these steps can be used on AWS just as well (just skip steps 1 & 2, and use one of the Ubuntu Cloud Images in the AWS region of your choice).  Enjoy!

Ubuntu Cloud Images and Eustore: The Eucalyptus Cloud Administrator’s Image Management Dream

Ubuntu provides versatile cloud images that can be utilized on various cloud deployment infrastructures.  Eucalyptus’s euca2ools eustore tool makes it easier for cloud administrator’s to bundle, upload and register images on Eucalyptus clouds.  Using eustore-install-image with Ubuntu Cloud images provides the best of both worlds – solid cloud images that can be easily deployed to any Eucalyptus cloud environment.

Set Up Euca2ools Configuration File

Setting up a euca2ools configuration file makes it easier and more efficient to interact with the euca2ools commands.  For this blog entry, the euca2ools configuration file ~/.euca/euca2ools.ini was set up with the following information:

[global]
default-region = LayinDaSmackDown
[user admin]
key-id = L4836KVYWMJCXT4T6Q6B9
secret-key = XCJ6sZVFVfFMR4DNVIUL7N7e4cgk8ebvEW0ej5dZ
account-id = 441445882805
private-key = /home/hspencer/admin-creds/euca2-admin-c9e4580c-pk.pem
certificate = /home/hspencer/admin-creds/euca2-admin-c9e4580c-cert.pem
[region LayinDaSmackDown]
autoscaling-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/AutoScaling
ec2-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/Eucalyptus
elasticloadbalancing-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/LoadBalancing
iam-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/Euare
monitoring-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/CloudWatch
s3-url = http://10.104.1.216:8773/services/Walrus
eustore-url =http://emis.eucalyptus.com/
certificate = /home/hspencer/admin-creds/cloud-cert.pem

After setting up the euca2ools confirmation file, to utilize this file, run any euca2ools command with the –region option.  For example:

$ euca-describe-images --region admin@

Since kernel, ramdisk and root filesystem images will be bundled, uploaded and registered, the cloud administrator’s credentials were used in the euca2ools configuration file.  For more information about kernel and ramdisk management in Eucalyptus, check out the KB article entitled “Kernel and Ramdisk Management in Eucalyptus”.

Ubuntu Cloud Images

To obtain Ubuntu Cloud images that will be bundled, uploaded and registered with eustore-install-image, download the supported Ubuntu Cloud image release of your choice from the Ubuntu Cloud Images page. Download the file thats ends with either amd64.tar.gz or i386.tar.gz using either curl, wget or any other network transfer tool.

For example, to download the latest Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander Cloud image, run the following command:

$ wget http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/saucy/current/saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.tar.gz

This will download and save the saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.tar.gz file.  Now its time to use eustore-install-image to bundle, upload and register the image.

Bundle, Upload, Register The Image

As mentioned earlier, eustore-install-image will bundle, upload and register the image.  To do this, use the –tarball option of eustore-install-image with the tar-gzipped file downloaded from Ubuntu Cloud Image page.  The key flag here is the –hypervisor option.  Because Ubuntu Cloud images are crafted to work on multiple hypervisors (e.g. Xen, KVM, VMware, etc.), set the –hypervisor option to “universal”. Here is an example of using these options:

$ eustore-install-image -t saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.tar.gz -b ubuntu-saucy-server-amd64 --hypervisor universal -s "Ubuntu 13.10 - Saucy Salamander" -p ubuntu-saucy --region admin@ -a x86_64
Preparing to extract image...
Extracting kernel 100% |=========================================================================================| 5.34 MB 158.76 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
Bundling kernel 100% |=========================================================================================| 5.34 MB 27.39 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
-- Uploading kernel image --
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64-vmlinuz-generic.part.0 100% |=========================================================| 5.28 MB 20.91 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64-vmlinuz-generic.manifest.xml 100% |===================================================| 3.45 kB 26.26 kB/s Time: 0:00:00
Registered kernel image eki-2C54378B
Extracting ramdisk 100% |=========================================================================================| 89.56 kB 45.29 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
Bundling ramdisk 100% |=========================================================================================| 89.56 kB 8.31 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
-- Uploading ramdisk image --
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64-loader.part.0 100% |==================================================================| 89.38 kB 689.09 kB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64-loader.manifest.xml 100% |============================================================| 3.36 kB 26.03 kB/s Time: 0:00:00
Registered ramdisk image eri-015435B7
Extracting image 100% |=========================================================================================| 1.38 GB 183.45 MB/s Time: 0:00:08
Bundling image 100% |=========================================================================================| 1.38 GB 34.33 MB/s Time: 0:00:43
-- Uploading machine image --
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.0 ( 1/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 42.72 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.1 ( 2/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 41.06 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.2 ( 3/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 42.43 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.3 ( 4/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 44.56 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.4 ( 5/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 48.43 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.5 ( 6/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 57.00 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.6 ( 7/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 48.69 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.7 ( 8/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 51.00 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.8 ( 9/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 43.92 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.9 (10/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 46.26 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.10 (11/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 46.27 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.11 (12/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 48.74 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.12 (13/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 44.48 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.13 (14/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 44.20 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.14 (15/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 48.89 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.15 (16/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 46.45 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.16 (17/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 56.84 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.17 (18/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 53.62 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.18 (19/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 56.75 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.19 (20/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 48.67 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.20 (21/22) 100% |============================================================| 10.00 MB 44.25 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.part.21 (22/22) 100% |============================================================| 3.19 MB 18.21 MB/s Time: 0:00:00
saucy-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.manifest.xml 100% |===============================================================| 6.63 kB 41.32 kB/s Time: 0:00:00
Registered machine image emi-4EFE3A91
-- Done --
Installed new image emi-4EFE3A91

Now that the kernel, ramdisk and root filesystem are bundled, uploaded and registered, the launch permission of each image needs to be changed so that all the users of the Eucalyptus cloud can launch instances from these images.

$ euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all emi-4EFE3A91 --region admin@
launchPermission emi-4EFE3A91 ADD Group all
$ euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all eri-015435B7 --region admin@
launchPermission eri-015435B7 ADD Group all
$ euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all eki-2C54378B --region admin@
launchPermission eki-2C54378B ADD Group all

Thats it!  Now users can launch instances from the EMI, EKI and ERI as below:

$ euca-run-instances -k account1-user01 -t m1.medium emi-4EFE3A91 --region account1-user01@ --user-data-file cloud-init.config

Enjoy!

Step-by-Step Deployment of Docker on Eucalyptus 3.4 for the Cloud Administrator

Docker

Eucalyptus Systems, Inc.

Docker has been in the news lately as one of the hot open-source project promoting linux containers. Some use cases for Docker include the following:

  • Automation of packaging and application deployment
  • Lightweight PaaS environments
  • Automated testing and continuous integration/deployment
  • Deploying and scaling web applications, databases and backend services

The focus of this blog entry is to show how to deploy Docker on Eucalyptus from a cloud administrator’s point-of-view – all in the cloud.  This is a step-by-step guide to create an Docker EMI from an existing Ubuntu Cloud Raring EMI using AWS’s documentation.  This entry will also show how to build euca2ools from source in the Ubuntu Cloud image.

Prerequisites

This entry assumes the following:

After confirming that the prerequisites are met, let’s get started.

Creating an EMI From an Existing EMI

As mentioned earlier, these steps will be based off of  AWS’s documentation on creating an instance store-backed AMI from an existing AMI.  In this example, here is an existing Ubuntu Raring instance thats running on Eucalyptus:

$ euca-describe-instances --region eucalyptus-admin@
RESERVATION r-3E423E33 961915002812 default
INSTANCE i-827E3E88 emi-06663A57 euca-10-104-7-12.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
euca-172-17-118-27.eucalyptus.internal running euca-admin 0 m1.medium 
2013-11-18T22:41:35.694Z LayinDaSmackDown eki-28F338EB eri-51253C0A 
monitoring-disabled 10.104.7.12 172.17.118.27 instance-store

This instance is using the following EMI, EKI and ERI:

$ euca-describe-images emi-06663A57 eki-28F338EB eri-51253C0A --region eucalyptus-admin@
IMAGE eki-28F338EB latest-raring-kernel/raring-server-cloudimg-amd64-vmlinuz-generic.manifest.xml 
441445882805 available public x86_64 kernel instance-store
IMAGE emi-06663A57 latest-raring/raring-server-cloudimg-amd64.img.manifest.xml 441445882805 
available public x86_64 machine eki-28F338EB eri-51253C0A instance-store paravirtualized
IMAGE eri-51253C0A latest-raring-kernel/raring-server-cloudimg-amd64-loader.manifest.xml 441445882805 
available public x86_64 ramdisk instance-store

To start, copy the zip file cloud administrator credentials obtained by the euca_conf command mentioned in the Eucalyptus 3.4 documentation to the running instance:

# scp -i euca-admin.priv admin.zip 
ubuntu@euca-10-104-7-12.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com:/tmp/.

Next, install the following packages for the 3.8.0-33 kernel, and packages needed to build euca2ools:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ sudo apt-get install python-setuptools git python-lxml unzip linux-headers-3.8.0-33-generic linux-image-extra-3.8.0-33-generic

Find the ephemeral storage using the instance metadata service, format, and mount the ephemeral to /mnt/image:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ curl http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/block-device-mapping/ephemeral
sda2
ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ sudo mkdir /mnt/image
ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/vda2
ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ sudo mount /dev/vda2 /mnt/image

Download euca2ools from Github:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ git clone https://github.com/eucalyptus/euca2ools.git

Install euca2ools:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ cd euca2ools; sudo python setup.py install

Unzip the cloud administrator credentials in /tmp:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ cd /tmp; unzip admin.zip

Change to the root user, and source the cloud administrator credentials:

ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ sudo -s; source /tmp/eucarc

Bundle, upload and register the ramdisk and kernel under /boot:

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-bundle-image -i /boot/initrd.img-3.8.0-33-generic 
--ramdisk true -r x86_64
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-upload-bundle -b ubuntu-raring-docker-ramdisk 
-m /var/tmp/bundle-SQrAuT/initrd.img-3.8.0-33-generic.manifest.xml
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-register -n ubuntu-raring-docker-ramdisk 
ubuntu-raring-docker-ramdisk/initrd.img-3.8.0-33-generic.manifest.xml 
IMAGE eri-6BF033EE
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-bundle-image -i /boot/vmlinuz-3.8.0-33-generic 
--kernel true -r x86_64
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-upload-bundle -b ubuntu-raring-docker-kernel 
-m /var/tmp/bundle-31Lnxy/vmlinuz-3.8.0-33-generic.manifest.xml
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-register -n ubuntu-raring-docker-kernel 
ubuntu-raring-docker-kernel/vmlinuz-3.8.0-33-generic.manifest.xml
IMAGE eki-17093995

Use euca-bundle-vol to bundle the root filesystem. Make sure to exclude /tmp, /mnt/image, and /home/ubuntu. Additionally, make sure and set the size of the image to be 5 GB:

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-bundle-vol -p ubuntu-raring-docker 
-s 5120 -e /tmp,/root,/mnt/image,/home/ubuntu -d /mnt/image 
--kernel eki-17093995 --ramdisk eri-6BF033EE -r x86_64

Next, upload and register the root filesystem:

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-upload-bundle -b ubuntu-raring-docker-rootfs 
-m /mnt/image/ubuntu-raring-docker.manifest.xml
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-register -n ubuntu-raring-docker-rootfs 
ubuntu-raring-docker-rootfs/ubuntu-raring-docker.manifest.xml
IMAGE emi-26403979

We have the new EMI, EKI and ERI for the Docker instance.  Lastly, set the image permissions so that all users on the cloud can use the EMI, EKI and ERI:

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all emi-26403979
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all eki-17093995
root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-modify-image-attribute -l -a all eri-6BF033EE

Now its time to launch the Docker EMI.

Running the Docker Instance with Cloud-Init

Before launching the EMI, the cloud-init configuration file needs to be created.  This file will be responsible for configuring the instance repositories, downloading and installing Docker.  With your favorite command-line editor, create a file called cloud-init-docker.config, with the following content:

#cloud-config
apt_update: true
apt_upgrade: true
disable_root: true
packages:
 - less
cloud_config_modules:
 - ssh
 - [ apt-update-upgrade, always ]
 - updates-check
 - runcmd
runcmd:
 - [ sh, -xc, "INST_HOSTNAME=`/bin/hostname`; META_IP=`curl -s http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/local-ipv4`; echo ${META_IP} ${INST_HOSTNAME} >> /etc/hosts" ]
 - [ locale-gen, en_US.UTF-8 ]
 - [ sh, -xc, "wget -qO docker-io.gpg https://get.docker.io/gpg" ]
 - [ apt-key, add, docker-io.gpg ]
 - [ sh, -xc, "echo 'deb http://get.docker.io/ubuntu docker main' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/docker.list" ]
 - [ apt-get, update ]
 - [ apt-get, install, -y, --force-yes, lxc-docker ]
 - [ modprobe, -q, aufs ]

Now, use euca-run-instances to launch the instance:

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# euca-run-instances -k euca-admin emi-351237D1 
-t m1.medium --user-data-file cloud-init-docker.config

After launching the instance, leave the current instance to get back to end client.

root@euca-172-17-118-27:~# exit
exit
ubuntu@euca-172-17-118-27:~$ exit
logout
Connection to 10.104.7.12 closed.

Once the instance reaches running state, ssh into the instance using the keypair specified (which in this case will be euca-admin.priv), and execute the following Docker command to run an interactive shell session inside a minimal Ubuntu container:

$ euca-describe-instances --region eucalyptus-admin@
RESERVATION r-A1613D7F 961915002812 default
INSTANCE i-AFDB3D4C emi-26403979 euca-10-104-7-13.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com 
euca-172-17-118-16.eucalyptus.internal running euca-admin 0 m1.medium 
2013-11-19T01:21:10.880Z LayinDaSmackDown eki-17093995 eri-6BF033EE monitoring-disabled 
10.104.7.13 172.17.118.16 instance-store
# ssh -i euca-admin.priv ubuntu@euca-10-104-7-13.eucalyptus.euca-hasp.eucalyptus-systems.com
Welcome to Ubuntu 13.04 (GNU/Linux 3.8.0-33-generic x86_64)
* Documentation: https://help.ubuntu.com/
System information as of Thu Nov 14 23:18:38 UTC 2013
System load: 0.0 Users logged in: 0
 Usage of /: 21.6% of 4.89GB IP address for eth0: 172.17.184.76
 Memory usage: 4% IP address for lxcbr0: 10.0.3.1
 Swap usage: 0% IP address for docker0: 10.1.42.1
 Processes: 83
Graph this data and manage this system at https://landscape.canonical.com/
Get cloud support with Ubuntu Advantage Cloud Guest:

http://www.ubuntu.com/business/services/cloud

Use Juju to deploy your cloud instances and workloads:

https://juju.ubuntu.com/#cloud-raring

New release '13.10' available.
Run 'do-release-upgrade' to upgrade to it.
Last login: Thu Nov 14 23:08:09 2013 from 10.104.10.6
ubuntu@euca-172-17-184-76:~$ sudo docker run -i -t ubuntu /bin/bash
Unable to find image 'ubuntu' (tag: latest) locally
Pulling repository ubuntu
8dbd9e392a96: Download complete
b750fe79269d: Download complete
27cf78414709: Download complete
root@041d5ddcd6b9:/# (Ctrl-p Ctrl-q to exit out of shell)
ubuntu@euca-172-17-184-76:~$ sudo docker ps
CONTAINER ID IMAGE COMMAND CREATED STATUS PORTS NAMES
041d5ddcd6b9 ubuntu:12.04 /bin/bash 27 seconds ago Up 26 seconds pink_frog

Thats it!  For more information regarding Docker, please refer to the latest Docker documentation.

Enjoy!